Women In Science Series: Katherine Freese

 Photo Courtesy of un.org

Photo Courtesy of un.org

This week, I will be writing a series called "Women In Science" where I will pick out 5 different influential women in the differing fields of S.T.E.M. Each person will be someone who is currently contributing to further our knowledge of the world around us in one way or another. For the first post, it is my honor to write about theoretical astrophysicist, Katherine Freese. 

 Photo Courtesy of Umich.edu

Photo Courtesy of Umich.edu

Dr. Freese is such an amazing scientist. In her career, she has already contributed to early research on dark matter and dark energy, as well as being one of the first to propose a way to discover dark matter. Her ideas are currently be experimented on at the IceCube Neutrino Observatory. She also produced the idea of a "Dark Star" where dark matter annihilation, rather than fusion, is its power source.

The beginning of the universe has become another main focus of hers. 

Her natural inflation model is a theoretically well-motivated variant of inflation; it uses axionic-type particles to provide the required flat potentials to drive the expansion. In 2013, observations made by the European Space Agency’s Planck Satellite show that the framework of natural inflation matches the data.
— Wikipedia
 Photo Courtesy Alan Guth/YouTube

Photo Courtesy Alan Guth/YouTube

Katherine Freese was born in Germany, but studied at Princeton, Columbia, and the University of Chicago, where she received her PhD in Astrophysics/Cosmology. She currently teaches at University of Michigan. To get a grasp on how smart and creative Dr. Freese really is, check out her public lecture below on Dark Matter! You can also follow her on Twitter as I do @ktfreese.