International Women's Day 2017: Celebrating Women in Science

Last year, I ran a series called "Women in Science" and seeing as today is International Women's Day, it seemed appropriate to share with you my articles on these amazing women again. Also known as "Day Without A Woman" day, the strike/day exists to show current inequalities women still face today and how much we lose as a society when women go on strike. As an advocate for feminism, the least I can do is spread the great work of some amazing scientists that are working actively right now to make the world a better place. Click/tap below to read more on each person.

Click/tap below to read more on each person.

Photo Courtesy of Umich.edu

Photo Courtesy of Umich.edu

Katherine Freese

Dr. Freese is such an amazing scientist. In her career, she has already contributed to early research on dark matter and dark energy, as well as being one of the first to propose a way to discover dark matter. Her ideas are currently be experimented on at the IceCube Neutrino Observatory. She also produced the idea of a "Dark Star" where dark matter annihilation, rather than fusion, is its power source.

 
Photo Courtesy of Rockefeller.edu

Photo Courtesy of Rockefeller.edu

Cornelia Bargmann

Cori Bargmann is an American neurobiologist who attended the University of Georgia and completed her graduate studies at M.I.T. in 1987.  Since then, she examined the molecular mechanisms of oncogenesis, and helped identify the role of Ras in bladder cancer. Additionally, she did work on neu - an oncogene that greatly improved treatments in breast cancer. After completing her post doc at M.I.T., she went on to exploring chemosensory behavior in C. elegans, and achieved several breakthroughs, one of which being that nematodes (roundworms) have a sense of smell.

 
Photo Courtesy of Washington.edu

Photo Courtesy of Washington.edu

Emily Levesque

Moving onward into space, we look at a scientist who focuses primarily on stellar astrophysics. She works out of the department of Astronomy U.W. as an assistant professor. It is a true honor to write an article about the intelligent, Emily Levesque. 

 

Cara Santa Maria

This scientist is someone I first heard speak on an episode of Neil DeGrasse Tyson's podcast, "Star Talk". Since then, I've seen her speak on multiple shows online and off including: BBC America, CBS, CNN, Current TV, Fox, Fox News, G4tv, Nat Geo WILD, Science Channel, SundanceTV, and the Travel Channel. She is also a regularly on The Young Turksshow. It's my absolute pleasure to write an article today about the wonderful and talented, Cara Santa Maria.

 
Photo Courtesy of Twitter

Photo Courtesy of Twitter

Emily Calandrelli

I first heard her speak during a TED talk and was amazed at how engaging she made her talk feel. Emily got her education at West Virginia University and later, attended the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for her Masters. As Wikipedia explains, her experience extends well beyond these academic institutions.

If you'd like to learn more about women in science, check out a book called "Women in Science: 50 Fearless Pioneers Who Changed the World" that can be found by clicking below:

 
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